Taylor Aronson Signs with HC Lada in Russia

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

What would the Milwaukee Admirals 2016 AHL Calder Cup Playoffs have looked like if this scene, Taylor Aronson playing against the Grand Rapids Griffins, played out? (Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

As first mentioned in my earlier report on the subject, Taylor Aronson had left the Milwaukee Admirals at the end of the regular season and never came back with a mention of receiving an offer from a team in Russia. Thankfully for that Aronson that team didn’t pullout of their commitment to him because now a deal is official. Aronson has just signed a one-year contract with HC Lada of Russia’s KHL. Although, the team hilariously is using a photograph of Taylor Beck in their press release announcing the signing. Perhaps that will cause another departure later down the road?

(Photo Credit: Christina Shapiro)

(Photo Credit: Christina Shapiro)

The word I keep coming back to in relation to this topic is avoidable. This was all insanely avoidable. Aronson opted to re-sign with the Nashville Predators last off-season. If he was already harboring resentment towards the organization for behind the scenes politics, while knowing how thick the glass ceiling is to break into that Predators defensive core, why not opt or request free agency then and there? Further more, as things continued to build and brew with the roster additions coming in as they did I’m sure a trade request could have even manifested itself and probably been able to be performed either by an actual trade or a Kevin Henderson-style AHL loan swap the likes of which happened 2013-14 and saw the Admirals get Francis Wathier in return on loan. Henderson wasn’t liking his position in the organization. It was rubbing some the wrong way. Problem solved – and it ended up working a treat for him as he won that year’s Calder Cup as a member of the Texas Stars.

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

The final area that could have been tapped into, that would have made this all avoidable, comes in the form of shutting up and playing out the contract. This was a career year for Aronson. He could have put a playoff stamp down on the end of it to have made signing him as a free agent all that more attractive. Not to mention, who is to say him doing that wouldn’t have made him being the bottom-six defensive option in Nashville next season? Rather than do any of that. Rather than play out the contract, be a professional, be a teammate, and seek job opportunities at the end of the season. Aronson deserted his organization, his coaches that were loyal to seeing him develop into an NHL name, his teammates that he played and fought alongside, and a team that had just clinched a division title and was three-games away from starting the playoffs. I can’t fathom the support group that Aronson has around him for that idea to have not been shot down on first mention much less his own personal psychology to think leaving a team at that point in a season was good for his image and career. No one in this game wants a “me” before “we” player. Aronson is going to have that label printed on his forehead for the rest of his career and its a label he created and tattooed Mike Tyson style to his face. It’s all anyone should ever see. Which brings me to the second word I keep coming back to in this story: unfortunate. Because this should never have happened at all.

Thoughts on the Taylor Aronson subject? Do you feel like he ever has a chance to return and play hockey in North America? This KHL team offered him a one-year contract. How do you feel that Aronson abandoned the Milwaukee Admirals the day of clinching a division for a one-year KHL contract?

Be sure to keep updated with Admirals Roundtable through social media platform of your choice: follow along Twitter, like us on Facebook, get photo updates on Instagram, and listen along on SoundCloud.

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Roundtable’s 2015-16 Most Valuable Player Award

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

Throughout these Inaugural Roundtable Awards I feel the general response has been good in respect to the ones who’ve won the respective awards. There have been some close calls but I’ve spoken to them and why one instead of the other.

If there is any award in sports that can drive me up a wall, from the pure name and selection process, it is that of Most Valuable Player. Often times the player deemed most valuable to his or her team is more-so the one that is simply the league’s most outstanding player. When there are teammates within the top five of each other in an MVP vote process doesn’t that show why neither of those players is the most valuable to their team considering they have as good of an option on the roster?

I could go on and on with that tangent for a considerable length but I hope that sets the tone. Just because you ended the season with the most goals, most assists, most points, best plus/minus, most wins in net, best save percentage, or shutouts doesn’t necessarily reflect a complete body of work – not really. So when I say that Félix Girard is the Roundtable’s selection for Most Valuable Player of the 2015-16 Season I hope those that didn’t see him play stick around to read the following. Because those who really watched the Milwaukee Admirals play this season know just how crucial of a figure Girard was to the team every single game.

Unless you are a Californian team in the American Hockey League you are tasked with playing a 76-game regular season schedule. This season there was only one player who played every single regular season game for the Admirals, Girard. The next closest would be his winger on the top penalty killing unit, Frédérick Gaudreau, who was healthy scratched on opening night before suiting up the rest of the season.

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

Girard may not have had the offensively flashy season that his fellow French Fry had but it was a solid progression from his first pro season. In 2014-15, Girard scored 9 points (4 goals, 5 assists) in 61 games – missing the rest of that season from mid-March due to injury. In 2015-16, Girard scored 21 points (5 goals, 16 assists) in 76 games. This season’s stat-line includes points on both sides of special teams where he had 3 shorthanded points (2 shorthanded goals, 1 shorthanded assist) as well as an assist on the power-play. I know, I know. Just a single assist from the power-play? Well, keep in mind that Girard’s game isn’t an offensive one. It’s a defensive one. Girard’s ability in the face-off circle is astonishingly good. He had to have taken the majority of defensive zone face-offs for the Admirals this season and it started to become a running gag on the press section that “if Girard is on the ice, the team can go for those home run style stretch passes without the fear of icing the puck because they’ll win the draw and try it again until it works.” With that level of confidence in your center to win face-offs why wouldn’t you use that on the power-play? It wasn’t until the very end of the regular season when the Admirals started rolling #16 on the ice as part of the power-play. He did what he normally does, too. He won the face-offs and let those around him really shine.

(Photo Credit: Stephanie Moebius)

(Photo Credit: Stephanie Moebius)

The best aspect of Girard’s game comes in an area of high level importance that can be taken for granted, the penalty kill. I’ve been watching Milwaukee Admirals hockey from up close and behind the curtain since the 2012-13 season. I have never watched another player on the ice perform better on the penalty kill than Girard. The only Admirals players that I can think of are Austin Watson and Mark Van Guilder both of whom Girard has matched their two great assets and exceeded them by adding one of his own. Watson was a puck magnet of a player when it came to blocking shots. Girard doesn’t shy away from laying the body down, either. Van Guilder was tremendously skilled at winning face-offs and was a great penalty killer because of it. Girard is a better face-off man than Van Guilder. What is it that Girard offers that those two don’t? Incredible skating ability to hound puck carriers and make those plays along or back to the blueline risky if botched. Girard is fast of feet and fast of mind. The teams he goes up against know that. And that gets in your head when you know your time and space isn’t what it could be. The Admirals ended the 2015-16 season with a 84.9 penalty kill to slot them in at eighth best in the AHL and third best in the AHL’s Western Conference. Girard was a massive part of that accomplishment.

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

If there were any last statement to be made on Girard as Roundtable’s Most Valuable Player for the 2015-16 Season it would come in the form of setting the right example and tone for the team. Not only is everything written above how he went about his business that “setting the tone” is quantifiable in the form of just how often the Admirals coaching staff saw fit to begin hockey games with Girard’s line for the opening puck drop. Girard played in all 76 games for the Admirals this season. He started 18 games for the Admirals this season with the bulk of those responsibilities coming in playoff mode. From 3/12/16 to the end of the regular season, a span of 16 games, the Admirals started Girard for 12 games and would start him for all 3 games of their 2016 AHL Calder Cup Playoffs. Girard wasn’t Mr. Flash. He wasn’t your human highlight reel. He was the best player on the ice that you didn’t even think about as you went home from Admirals games this season. When the Vladislav Kamenev‘s or Kevin Fiala‘s of the game are getting so much attention they themselves are quick to praise someone such as an Adam Payerl on their line for being the grunt worker that makes life easier for them to be them. Girard is just that type of player and offers so much to the big picture of a hockey game that he might get lost out in all the flashy teenage prospects that enter the pipeline. He’s the table setter of the Admirals.

It’s funny to think about that last sentence, the table setter, when thinking back on this season. The day that the Admirals announced their official move across the street to the UW-Milwaukee Panther Arena all three members of the French Fries were on-hand and I jokingly told Jimmy Oligny that he was the heart and soul of that group. I said that in the sense that Oligny is often the one who keeps things the lightest of the three and seems to be the one that gets everyone laughing. While that might be the case off the ice the story on the ice is that the heart and soul of the Admirals is Girard. When reviewing just how much Girard was utilized to set the right tone for playoff level hockey late in the season in makes you wonder what the 2014-15 season might have been had Girard not suffered a season ending shoulder injury on 3/14/15 in Texas. For all the thoughts of “what if” from that season which saw the Admirals miss out on playoff hockey for the first time in twelve consecutive seasons – what if Girard didn’t get hurt? What if the Admirals made the playoffs last season and players had playoff experience for this season?

Plenty of amusing question marks when thinking back on what Girard’s injury at the end of his first pro playing season actually meant to the Admirals. What isn’t a question mark is his status for next season. He’ll be back. And the Admirals will have their main motor from day-one to set the right tone for the 2016-17 season. The only question that becomes one in need of answering is whether or not being a supremely talented defensive minded competitor has him lost on the Nashville Predators radar compared to all the young blood that surrounds him. Is Girard NHL quality? My answer, when you consider playing time for the Predators these days is limited to bottom six level work, is 100% yes.

Be sure to keep updated with Admirals Roundtable through social media platform of your choice: follow along Twitter, like us on Facebook, get photo updates on Instagram, and listen along on SoundCloud.

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Roundtable’s 2015-16 Goalie of the Year Award

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

If you were reading the selection for Roundtable’s 2015-16 Rookie of the Year Award and thinking, “I wonder if Juuse Saros will win Goalie of the Year too,” you were right! Roundtable’s Goalie of the Year for the 2015-16 Season is in fact going to be Saros. I know, this one is a little less anticlimactic and story driven considering you already received so much on Saros in that previous award.

Rather than leave this award blank, referring again and again to read that Rookie of the Year write-up, allow me to take another approach to Saros’ excellent 2015-16 season and the road ahead for him as well as comment on the season that was for Marek Mazanec.

Dragging you all to the way back when, and the long-long ago (the end of the 2014-15 season where the Milwaukee Admirals failed to make the playoffs for the first time since their debut season in the AHL), I had a really good conversation with Magnus Hellberg in regards to the transition of playing in goal in Europe to North America.

“People go so much harder to the net here. They actually shoot more for rebounds. You have to think where you put the rebounds. You have to fight through a lot more traffic than you have to do at home. Obviously the ice is much bigger home so they have more time and they maybe skate around and hold the puck more but here it’s more like a straight game where people put the puck to the net and just go hard. It took awhile to managed some of the aspects of that.” ~Magnus Hellberg

Now, everyone is unique and handles this transition their own way. No two players are truly alike in that respect. In recent memory of Admirals who made the switch from Europe to North America there have been some not so terrific results: Atte Engren, Jani LajunenPatrick Cehlin, Joonas RaskMikko VainonenJohan Alm, and Kristian Näkyvä. That’s not to say that the Nashville Predators were wrong to bring these talents in. It’s not to say that they continued to perform erratically in Europe. Some players are just far better suited to the European game and that extends to North American players as well, Stevie Moses.

The goaltending and defensive positions are where this transition stands out when players are struggling to adapt. It’s far easier to expose those two positions when a player is rattled by pace, lateral movement, and more rugged “in your face” play associated with the North American game. When it’s good, it’s normal. When it’s bad, whoa man is it bad to watch.

To have a general idea of what both of those mean all you need to do is think about Mazanec’s journey these past three-seasons. He is fully capable of being lights out but, in his earlier seasons, he was also fully capable of some serious deer in headlights goaltending. Here’s the thing though, because as I said it is an entirely individualized experience, that was his learning and developmental process. This past season was Mazanec’s best wire-to-wire season. The numbers may not 100% back that up, the last game of the regular season when the team in front of him took the night off didn’t help, but there wasn’t one game where Mazanec switched off or struggled. He was locked in this season at a time when the real between the ears battle was going on with a high level prospect in Saros bumping his ol’ battery-mate Hellberg and a potential back-up role in Nashville in 2016-17 a possibility with a solid campaign of work. He did that. He did that in his third full-season of North American hockey.

If there was any true standout element to Saros’ debut season to North America it was that he displayed that from his first start of the season to the end. He is 20-years old and plays with the hockey mind of someone who has been at this for quite some time. What will Saros be like once he starts to really get comfortable with the North American game? His rookie season stat-line was: 38 appearances (all starts) with a 29-8-0-0 record, 2.24 goals against average, 0.920 save percentage, 4 shutouts, and he stopped all 13 shootout attempts he faced to earn the Admirals 4 wins with the game squarely on him in net. That is his baseline and foundation for the years to come. It is tremendous to think about the possibilities for Saros moving forward.

Be sure to keep updated with Admirals Roundtable through social media platform of your choice: follow along Twitter, like us on Facebook, get photo updates on Instagram, and listen along on SoundCloud.

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Roundtable’s 2015-16 Forward of the Year Award

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

Let’s get past some of yesterday’s doom and gloom and get back to a more light topic, shall we? If there is a trickier group to navigate for end-season awards it would be judging who in fact was the Best Forward. The options and reasons are plentiful. So much so I’ll be going through those that were really in my running for this award and why.

The Milwaukee Admirals depth was brilliant in the 2015-16 season and the true showcase for that came up front at forward. The season started with so many centers on the team that Cody Bass, who would end up contributing to the Nashville Predators playoff run, was pushed to the wing. There was also some fella named Miikka Salomäki that started his season in Milwaukee. The organization’s forward depth was that packed.

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

When really weighing up all the options there was really one forward that set himself apart as the most well-rounded of the group this season. Someone who jumped over the boards as a first choice option on both sides of special teams and contributed in all aspects of the game. What makes it all the more special, something that again speaks to the depth of the organization, was that this forward wasn’t even drafted by the Predators. He was an undrafted free agent signing by the Admirals in 2014-15, spent his first pro playing season splitting time between the AHL and ECHL, came to Milwaukee for the 2015-16 season, was a healthy scratch on opening night, played every single game from then on out, earned an AHL All-Star Selection, and then an NHL contract from the Predators. Roundtable’s Forward of the Year for the 2015-16 Season could only go to Frédérick Gaudreau.

This story took on a life of its own so quickly this past season. By the end of November Gaudreau had already surpassed his offensive numbers in the AHL from his first pro playing season. In 2015-15, Gaudreau scored 11 points (4 goals, 7 assists) in 43 games as a member of the Admirals. It took him 16 games in 2015-16 to pass that and that wasn’t even when he was at his best.

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

The month of December was Gaudreau’s true breakout moment. At that time Admirals team captain Colton Sissons was recalled by the Predators. Gaudreau stepped directly into Sissons roles on the ice and succeeded in all of them. If you feel Gaudreau matching his AHL numbers from his first pro season in two months time was impressive look at December and December alone. Gaudreau surpassed his first AHL season’s offensive numbers within December 2015: 12 points (4 goals, 8 assists) in 14 games. It was that month that made him a must-sign target for the Predators who penned him to a two-year entry level contract. Two days after that moment he was selected to represent the Admirals at the AHL All-Star festivities in Syracuse alongside his head coach Dean Evason. There, he would be part of the first ever AHL All-Star Challenge and score 3 assists in the Final where the Central Division All-Stars won the inaugural event.

(Photo Credit: @mkeadmirals // Twitter)

(Photo Credit: @mkeadmirals // Twitter)

All the scoring numbers are very evident to those who didn’t event get to watch him play in Milwaukee. He ended the season scoring 42 points (15 goals, 27 assists in 75 games which includes scoring 23 points (7 goals, 16 assists) on the Admirals power-play. For those that didn’t get to watch him play in Milwaukee what you don’t see is his tireless amounts of effort exhausted shift after shift from a defensive standpoint. His work on the Admirals top forward line penalty kill, with Félix Girard, might be as fun of a penalty killing unit as I’ve ever seen. The two work so well, are intelligent in the way they take away time and space, and have the abilities to make transitioning from penalty killing to shorthanded attack. Gaudreau also might just be one of those rare examples of a forward that works better as a center than as a winger. It isn’t that he skates poorly in open ice, because he doesn’t, but he is incredibly smart at reading the game and plays the middle of the ice extremely well on both sides of the puck. The more that he can see the game in front of him the better he is at navigating through the given situation, offensive zone, defensive zone, power-play, or penalty kill. It’s not the flashy game that you might get from some of the more high profile Predators prospects but it also isn’t a far cry from exactly the type of player Gaudreau was tasked with filling in for in December, Sissons. Nothing drastic, nothing over the top, just smart and consistent play and effort.

(Photo Credit: Stephanie Moebius)

(Photo Credit: Stephanie Moebius)

Life at the AHL level is made all the more fun to cover when stories like Gaudreau’s emerge. There are so many players that go undrafted. The game of hockey is a massive international competition in which so many variables come in at the NHL Draft. Just because you go undrafted doesn’t mean the journey ends. Just because you end up playing hockey in the ECHL on an AHL or ECHL contract doesn’t mean the path to the NHL ends. When the Admirals 2015-16 season officially came to an end with their first round playoff defeat to the Grand Rapids Griffins the Predators recalled a handful of players from the Admirals. Gaudreau was one of those players. He wasn’t drafted by the Predators. He scored 7 points (5 goals, 2 assists) in 14 games as a member of the Cincinnati Cyclones in his first pro season under an AHL contract. He signed a new AHL contract in the summer of 2015 before earning his NHL contract through effort and performance in January 2016. He didn’t get into any of the Predators playoff action. But, much like the prospects or ATO signings at the end of an Admirals season, he was given a glimpse behind the curtain of what life at the NHL level is like. The Predators wanted that for Gaudreau. That’s a massive display of appreciation for someone that truly earned their place.

~Admirable Mentions~

Last night on Twitter I threw out a little poll to see who out of my top candidates you thought was deserving of this award. Those candidates were Gaudreau, Pontus Åberg, Max Görtz, and Kevin Fiala because Twitter limited me to four poll answers. At the time I’m publishing this there were 84 votes with Åberg holding the majority claim of 40%, Gaudreau in second place with 35%, and Görtz and Fiala rounded out the last of it.

Without question many more than just those names could have been listed. Girard comes to mind. Adam Payerl and Matt White‘s contributions to the Admirals this season were terrific. Max Reinhart had a career year as part of the Admirals. And Vladislav Kamenev really impressed at center in his debut season to North American hockey.

(Photo Credit: Stephanie Moebius)

(Photo Credit: Stephanie Moebius)

Yet, it is those top four that I stuck with and there is a good reason why that Twitter poll went the way that it did. As much as can be made of Åberg hot finish to the 2015-16 season he really had a solid start and middle before that. This season Åberg looked so much more comfortable and in control on the ice. I can think of no better complement to the play of a forward than when a coaching staff looks to double shift you regardless of what line you get that second shift on. You’re playing so well – get on the ice ASAP. That was what the Admirals coaching staff was getting forced into doing by the end of the season with Åberg and that all came together after improvement after improvement during the course of the season. If Gaudreau can log two great games for the Admirals at the end of the 2014-15 season that sparked him I can’t wait to see what the end to the 2015-16 season does for Åberg. In the final 21 games of the regular season Åberg scored 22 points (11 goals, 11 assists) and was held without a point in only 5 games. He was held without a point during the Admirals 3 game playoff series defeat to the Griffins but had the instant confidence booster by being given his NHL and Stanley Cup Playoffs debuts for the Predators. He was tabbed to play over the likes of Mike Ribeiro. That’s your feather in the cap moment. Now comes the exciting time for Åberg of getting back and staying there.

(Photo Credit: Christina Shapiro)

(Photo Credit: Christina Shapiro)

If not for some Juuse Saros kid your choice for Roundtable’s Rookie of the Year would have gone to Görtz. Since his draft selection by the Predators in 2012 I’ve kept an eye out in his play in Sweden and was excited by what he could be for the Predators organization. He has the size, the shot, and the strength needed to be a quality power-forward on the wing. I couldn’t have imagined him performing as well as he did in year-one of North American hockey. His best scoring performance of his career prior to this season came in Färjestad’s under-20 squad where he produced 35 points (17 goals, 18 assists) in 28 games in the 2011-12 season. His best effort prior to this season at a senior team, or in a professional league, came in 2014-15 with Frölunda where he scored 28 points (14 goals, 14 assists) in 53 games. That level of play not only carried into Milwaukee at the AHL level he bettered his career high: 47 points (18 goals, 29 assists) in 72 games. If Görtz follows the sophomore season upswing like his fellow Swede Åberg did things should get plenty fun in Milwaukee and possibly Nashville in 2016-17.

(Photo Credit: Stephanie Moebius)

(Photo Credit: Stephanie Moebius)

In the words of Big Ben, “Kevin Fiala… yeah.” There is no denying two things from Fiala’s 2015-16 season. There was some immaturity and there was some incredible play on the ice. What I feel is important to note is that at 19-years of age that maturity thing is correctable as time goes on while on-ice abilities can also get even better with age. Fiala not only flipped off the entire Lake Erie Monsters bench, coming to an AHL Western Conference Finals near you, he also was the Admirals leading scorer for the 2015-16 season with 50 points (18 goals, 32 assists) from 66 games. As much fuss that can be made of his sluggish and feisty start to the season – it’s relatable. Fiala is a big time competitor. He talked himself up big for an opening day roster spot in Nashville to start this past season. That didn’t happen. He comes to Milwaukee and proceeds to go 11 games before scoring his first goal. There is a level of frustration that boiled over and manifested itself on to the ice at the start of the season. What you hoped to see is what you got to see by the end of the season. He was relaxed. He was loose. And he really seemed to have learned a tremendous deal from that stressful and frustrating start to the season. The developmental process to the game of hockey sometimes lends itself more to adjustments off the ice as much as on it. That is something Fiala really came to grips with as he comes of age. His get under your skin feisty and competitive attutude on the ice is an asset. He just needs to learn how to channel it the right way. That’s what the 2015-16 season was for him in a nutshell.

Be sure to keep updated with Admirals Roundtable through social media platform of your choice: follow along Twitter, like us on Facebook, get photo updates on Instagram, and listen along on SoundCloud.

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Taylor Aronson: Elephant in the Room

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

There were three-games remaining in the Milwaukee Admirals regular season when they officially clinched the Central Division title. The team had just completed a power house of a four-game road trip that saw them sweep through Manitoba and Charlotte and riding a six-game winning and twelve-game point streak back to Milwaukee. Something that wouldn’t return to Milwaukee from that moment forward though would be defenseman Taylor Aronson. Why? Well, the simplest answer, he quit.

The Trojan Horse has been burned on the subject as to what the personal reasons were that ended with Aronson’s absence with the Admirals in their final regular season games and opening round playoff series. At the Nashville Predators end-season press conference that was conducted today General Manager David Poile stated the following when asked by Penalty Box Radio‘s Justin Bradford on the situation and whether or not he’ll be receiving a contract as a pending restricted free agent this off-season:

“It’s a grey area right now. I mean, it was a situation where we actually called someone else up, and he thought it should be him, and he left the team. So, we suspended him. And he is currently suspended. So, we need to have some discussions and see whether it makes sense that we bring him back, he wants to be back, that type of situation. It was an unfortunate.. probably little bit of an immature move on his part but that’s my opinion. So we’ll have to see in time whether we make up or not.” ~Nashville Predators General Manager David Poile

To figure out where this all starts is a long story but one that perhaps is best told as it happened. That four-game road trip that the Admirals had, Manitoba to Charlotte, is your starting point for the story and official end point for Aronson’s season. At the time the Admirals were flying back to Milwaukee from Charlotte Aronson was one of the Admirals top defenseman during the 2015-16 season. He had produced 40 points (4 goals, 36 assists) from 64 games with a plus/minus rating of +5 and 24 penalty minutes. It was the first time the Admirals had a defenseman produce 40 points since Roman Josi did it in the 2010-11 season and the most assists by an Admirals defenseman since Robert Dietrich produced 37 assists in the 2009-10 season.

What could cause someone at the height of such a highly successful team and individual season to abandon everything? There isn’t one specific item but rather a collection of circumstances. Some of which go untold and extend far beyond this past playing season.

During the Fifteen interview that I conducted with Aronson at the end of the season I was taken aback by when he was critical of his time spent with the Cincinnati Cyclones in the ECHL. During the time in which I asked what was the most embarrassing moment of his hockey career to this point he quickly responded with his playing time in the ECHL.

“When you come out of juniors or when you’re doing anything the [ECHL] is so frowned upon – looked so down upon. Once you go there you’ll never make it, you’ll never do anything apparently. That’s what the stigma is. So, that’s what I didn’t want and it happened.” ~Taylor Aronson (4/1/16)

That surprised me in the sense that many players have been able to utilize the extra time that the ECHL can afford them, that won’t be available at the AHL level at the given time, and use it to propel themselves. Anthony Bitetto‘s stint with the Cyclones during the 2012-13 season really made a positive impact in his development and saw him grow off of that spell in the ECHL to the point where he is now locked in with the Nashville Predators until 2018.

When Aronson was entering his 2013-14 season with the organization he had only logged 26 games at the AHL level with 3 assists and 12 penalty minutes to his name. The bulk of his time was spent as a member of the Cyclones. In his first pro season he played 40 games in the ECHL while scoring 18 points (6 goals, 12 assist). The following season he would log 38 games in the ECHL and score 13 points (1 goal, 12 assists). Those ECHL spells came interspersed with time in Milwaukee at the AHL level.

In Aronson’s 2013-14 season he never saw one breath taken at the AHL level. His entire season was spent as a member of the Cyclones where he exploded for 38 points (6 goals, 32 assists) in 65 games with a plus/minus rating of +28. This ECHL run included taking part in an amazing playoff journey for the Cyclones that ended in the 2014 Kelly Cup Finals where they would fall just short of glory losing 4-2 to the Alaska Aces.

The next season Aronson arrived to the Admirals as a completely rejuvenated player. He didn’t make the Admirals due to him being the lone right-handed shooting defenseman in pre-season camp he made it because he earned it. Aronson, a year after spending all his time in the ECHL, spent the entirety of the 2014-15 season as a member of the Admirals in the AHL where he scored 32 points (3 goals, 29 assists) from 73 games. From being the top scoring defenseman on the Cyclones one year to the top scoring defenseman on the Admirals the next. What’s to be embarrassed about?

“I think that if I would have got chances here beforehand it may have been a little bit different. There was also things going behind the scenes that people don’t know about. So, it’s a give and take thing. Some people may not see my first two years as doing anything but it was a lot different going on.” ~Taylor Aronson (4/1/16)

There is where you can find strike one for Aronson: behind the scenes politics leading to resentment. You would feel all of that would have been dropped by the time Aronson earned his first career NHL call-up during that fantastic 2014-15 season. He re-signed with the organization in mid-July last summer and did more than just go about his business for the 2015-16 season. He was doing everything for the Admirals on defense and special teams this past season. So, what could have damaged things? Probably that last sentence combined with acquisition of Petter Granberg (strike two) and the end-season recalls of mid-season acquisitions Stefan Elliott and Corey Potter (strike three) by the Predators.

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

By all accounts, the Predators have to have one of the most difficult defensive groups to break into in the NHL. Their defense isn’t just loaded with talent but young talent at that. The proverbial glass ceiling is a thick one to break through but, given the injuries that crop up during the course of a hockey season, chances are there to make an impression given a recall opportunity. Aronson’s recall in February of 2015 came when Shea Weber was battling an illness, it was under emergency conditions, and Weber ended up playing while Aronson came and went without the NHL in-game experience. Earlier this past season the Predators claimed Granberg off of waivers from the Toronto Maple Leafs and Granberg would go on to fulfill a role with the Predators as a depth option. Glass ceiling thickens. Then came the Admirals defensive shake-up that saw great impacts to the way the team performed moving forward. Of the three defensemen acquired from January to the NHL’s Trade Deadline only Elliott and Potter would log NHL time. All that happening while a 24-year old Aronson questioned whether his time would ever come. By the time Potter was recalled for the Predators last regular season game, a game that offered nothing of value and saw many key regulars sitting out, it was 4/9/16. That same night Aronson was with the Admirals in Charlotte for the first of two-games in two-days. Aronson completed the trip and wasn’t seen in an Admirals uniform for the rest of the regular season or playoffs.

By now, everyone knows how the Admirals season came to an end. Following Aronson’s desertion the Admirals played three more regular season games and featured in the 2016 AHL Calder Cup Playoffs with an opening round series against the Grand Rapids Griffins. The Admirals won their first game without Aronson, a 3-1 victory over the Chicago Wolves, but then proceeded to lose their last five straight games including a three-game sweep by the Griffins to send the Admirals, the second best team in the AHL’s Western Conference this season based on points percentage, out of the playoffs in the opening round.

If there is anything that should send chills down your spine it isn’t the fact that Aronson quit, it shouldn’t be his abandonment and parallel to team performance drop off, it should be this. At a time when everyone on the team, returning from Charlotte to Milwaukee, was celebrating the fact that they just clinched the Central Division title Aronson was thinking about how fast he could pack up and go home. Per sources close to the situation Aronson cited that he had an offer from a team in Russia, didn’t want to get hurt considering he wasn’t going to be playing in Nashville anyways, and left. The team and Aronson proceeded to not have communications from the moment he left to, at the best of my knowledge, season’s end for the Admirals.

Blum-113012-1

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

When viewing the Aronson story from a distance there is another former Predators defenseman that comes to mind: Jonathon Blum. While Aronson was a third round draft choice by the Predators in 2010 Blum was a first round draft selection by the Predators in 2007. The defensive core for the Predators might not have been as incredibly deep as it is now but the same story basically played itself out in the form of a glass ceiling too thick to crack and stay on top of. Blum’s time in the organization can get summed up in his last season where he split the deck between the NHL and AHL during the 2012-13 lockout season. Whether it be his own individual performance or being passed over in favor of other up and coming defensive talents the simple gist was that a regular role wasn’t there for him. What did he do? He became a free agent and signed with an organization where the path to get into the NHL on a more regular basis was available, the Minnesota Wild. That ended up being a two-year odyssey in which Blum’s NHL playing time still wasn’t coming. He gave it a fair go. He then set his sights, as most longer tenured AHL players do, to playing professionally in Europe. For those that haven’t kept track, Blum’s 2015-16 season as part of Admiral Vladivostok in Russia’s KHL was fantastic. He scored 30 points (8 goals, 22 assists) in 55 games with a plus/minus rating of +13 and 45 penalty minutes. His performance was such that the KHL outfit rewarded him with a two-year contract extension.

(Photo Credit: Christina Shapiro)

(Photo Credit: Christina Shapiro)

Where do the Blum and Aronson stories meet then you ask? Well, look at the way Blum went about his business. The place for Blum in Nashville, despite being a first round draft choice by the organization, wasn’t there for him to have and he just wasn’t earning it as perhaps others might have. Rather than stew over the situation he elected to give another NHL organization a shot. That didn’t work so he did what you’d expect by traveling to Europe and taking in the professional leagues overseas. That did work very well and he now has something called options. His first option he took which was to sign a contract extension with the team that he performed so well for in Russia. His next option is where Aronson comes in because it is something that Aronson will struggle to ever come across again: returning to play professional hockey in North America. Should Blum continue to put together structured and solid efforts in the KHL he is still someone who hasn’t burned any bridges, maintained a professional attitude, and can still provide teams in the NHL or even AHL with what would be a solid -now- veteran presence.

Aronson left the Admirals and has made playing in Europe his first and only option while abandoning the organization that drafted him, the team that coached him up to the professional hockey player he is today, and the teammates he shared a locker room with. There really isn’t a simple apology that can account for that. It’s selfish and, as the Predators General Manager stated, immature. It’s something of a rarity to come across in a sport that is all about the “we” over “me” approach. If the road back to North America for someone like Blum looks rough at this moment it is a freshly asphalted one in comparison to the Wisconsin-esque pot hole infested misery that Aronson just constructed for himself.

Be sure to keep updated with Admirals Roundtable through social media platform of your choice: follow along Twitter, like us on Facebook, get photo updates on Instagram, and listen along on SoundCloud.

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Kristian Näkyvä Signs with Linköping HC

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

The first departure of the off-season has struck. Kristian Näkyvä will be returning to the Swedish Hockey League (SHL) after signing a two-year contract with Linköping HC.

This move isn’t entirely a surprise with Näkyvä just not being able to find either the offensive ability or chances that he was known for playing in Europe. In the 2014-15 season he had produced 29 points (10 goals, 19 assists) in 55 games with Luleå HF in the SHL. He also contributed 4 points (1 goal, 3 assists) in 9 playoff games for Luleå that season. It was that level of play that put him on the Nashville Predators map last off-season when they penned him to a one-year entry level contract. Consider that one and done.

I wouldn’t say that Näkyvä performed badly. His start to the 2015-16 season was shaky and he looked every bit the stereotype of a European skater getting overwhelmed by the North American game’s smaller rink and higher pace. With forwards this isn’t the worst issue or something that is so easily exposed. With defensemen it shouts mistakes into your face. Näkyvä was turned inside out frequently at the beginning of the season and was at times a slight concern to even see out on the ice defensively. The good news? He’s smart. He has a solid work ethic. And he improved. By the end of the season he looked far more comfortable and was settling down. The sad part is that he never truly got to show his full range as an offensive defenseman with power-play time extremely limited for the 25-year old Finn with those chances being handed to Taylor Aronson, Conor Allen, Trevor Murphy, Stefan Elliott, and then Patrick Mullen.

In the end, Näkyvä only managed to score 10 points (1 goal, 9 assists) in 69 games for the Admirals. It’s unfortunate that he couldn’t get to show off more of what he’s capable of but, hey, some players are just best suited for European hockey. And that isn’t a bad thing. I feel the next domino to fall, with a fairly similar story and result, will be Johan Alm.

Be sure to keep updated with Admirals Roundtable through social media platform of your choice: follow along Twitter, like us on Facebook, get photo updates on Instagram, and listen along on SoundCloud.

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Roundtable’s 2015-16 Defenseman of the Year Award

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

Unlike yesterday’s choice for Rookie of the Year I am probably going to be dividing opinion today. The nod for being the best defenseman of the Milwaukee Admirals in 2015-16 is a tight race between two or possibly even more candidates. While the cases can be made for those, feel free to make your’s in the comment section below, I’m going to make mine because Jimmy Oligny is my selection for Defenseman of the Year.

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

When you look back on two of the real feel good stories this season they get their start as undrafted free agents the season prior. Frédérick Gaudreau‘s story from undrafted free agent to earning an entry level contract with the Nashville Predators this season was tremendous. It would be a mistake if the Predators didn’t follow that up by doing the same with Oligny in the very near future. Both members of the now famed French Fries enjoyed brilliant 2015-16 campaigns. While Gaudreau’s was put in a bigger spotlight with his AHL Predators contract, All-Star selection, and end-season recall as a member of the Black Aces that traveled to Nashville for their playoff run it was just as solid of a season for his buddy Oligny. Being a shutdown defenseman isn’t as flashy as taking home Goal of the Season, or any of those other Gaudreau items for that matter, but the dirty worth that Oligny brings to the table is what can allow for much of the flash that the forwards are meant to do.

Oligny’s progression from 2014-15 to 2015-16 was steady. Yes, his offensive numbers saw an increase going from 5 points (1 goal, 4 assists) in 53 games to 14 points (3 goals, 11 assists) in 74 games, but it was his defensive game that saw the biggest step forward. Oligny really became the man to take the role of Joe Piskula or Anthony Bitetto from recent years as the left-side defenseman tasked with those key defensive zone and penalty kill situations. By season’s end it was a formality that your starting defensive pairing was going to by Oligny with Corey Potter to set the tone.

(Photo Credit: John Saraya)

(Photo Credit: John Saraya)

Speaking of setting the tone, the Admirals grit on the back-end of the defense was pretty much all established by Oligny this season. The 23-year old posted 6 fighting majors this season. The next closest to him on defense, Conor Allen, had half of that before being shipped out of Milwaukee. The rest only had a single or no fighting majors to their names with the burden to bring the muscle falling on Oligny’s shoulders.

Now comes the name of the other defenseman who I feel is insanely worthy of this award but just comes up short in the grand scheme of a complete body of work when compared to Oligny, Taylor Aronson. My choice on this award comes down to the defensive aspects of the defenseman game. Is that to say Aronson was poor on defense? No, he was often tasked early in the season as a security blanket for the much shakier and less reliable likes of Jonathan Diaby and Kristian Näkyvä plus did excellent work on the Admirals penalty kill. Is that to say I’m scoffing at Aronson’s offensive output of 40 points (4 goals, 36 assists) in 64 games? No, in fact that output was the most by an Admirals defenseman since some kid named Roman Josi posted 40 points (6 goals, 34 assists) in 69 games during the 2010-11 season.

Aronson is every bit as deserving for this little pat on the back as Oligny in my book. I just always come down to the name in the job title being defense. Oligny was a rock for the Admirals on defense and excellent at that better than any other Admirals defenseman this season. Aronson is in that conversation and gets the big time bonus points for the added areas to his game but, defensively, he wasn’t as polished as Oligny. Great news for the Milwaukee Admirals? Their Man of the Year this past season Oligny is due to be with the team for the next two-seasons.

Be sure to keep updated with Admirals Roundtable through social media platform of your choice: follow along Twitter, like us on Facebook, get photo updates on Instagram, and listen along on SoundCloud.

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Roundtable’s 2015-16 Rookie of the Year Award

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

His AHL Award is a bit more shiny than Admirals Roundtable’s but hey.. (Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

For the first time since I joined Admirals Roundtable I feel it is time to do some actual individual end-season awards. Admiral of the Month was a feature that started up for the 2014-15 season. The Roundtable Awards get their start at the conclusion of the 2015-16 season as a build to the eventual final Report Card feature.

The awards to come will be: Rookie of the Year, Defenseman of the Year, Forward of the Year, Goalie of the Year, and the Most Valuable Player. Those will all be unveiled over these next few days with the goal being for the 2015-16 Milwaukee Admirals Report Card to drop next Monday.

~Rookie of the Year~

There were some fantastic contributions this season from players making their debuts to the American Hockey League. This year’s newbies included: Juuse Saros, Max Görtz, Vladislav Kamenev, Trevor Murphy, Matt White, Eric Robinson, Jack Dougherty, Aaron Irving, and A.J. White. The Milwaukee Admirals also saw professional playing debuts in the playoffs for Anthony Richard and Yakov Trenin who might well see themselves up for this award in the near future.

All of those names did a solid job factoring in for the Admirals this past season. The team’s record speaks to how well all contributed to the overall cause. That’s really impressive when you consider the oldest player of those names was the previously ECHL battle tested White at 26-years old. The second oldest being Robinson at 25-years of age having completed his collegiate career at Dartmouth the season prior. And the bulk of that group being 20-years old or younger: Saros, Murphy, Irving, Dougherty, Kamenev, Richard, and Trenin. There weren’t many speed bumps to any of these debutants this season and all looked and played the part of pros incredibly well. That’s a great sign for the things to come knowing that’s the foundation for all of these guys to build from.

For all those rookies this season, and their various contributions and highlights, I feel the winner of the Roundtable’s 2015-16 Rookie of the Year Award is something of unanimous decision. Juuse Saros didn’t just put a stamp down in his first season of professional hockey in North America he made the transition from the European game look effortless.

(Photo Credit: Sarah Fuqua)

(Photo Credit: Sarah Fuqua)

The whirlwind of hype surrounding Saros prior to the start of the season could already be felt the season before that. He has been built up that big for that long at such a young age. His arrival marked the quickfire exit of former second round draft pick Magnus Hellberg in the off-season with the goal to be AHL hockey paired with Marek Mazanec in Milwaukee. At the time of Hellberg’s trade to the New York Rangers who could have imagined that Saros (38 starts) and Mazanec (38 starts and 1 relief appearance) would split time in net so evenly? When you factor in the minutes played during the playoffs Saros logged 2,365 minutes to Mazanec’s 2,405 minutes. That is a first year North American pro goaltender up against one in year-three. Not too shabby.

In addition, Saros numbers ended up being shockingly similar to that of Hellberg who played far more games for the Hartford Wolf Pack. Hellberg’s 2015-16 season: 30-20-3-0 record from 53 appearances, 2.40 goals against average, 0.918 save percentage, and 3 shutouts. Saros’ 2015-16 season: 29-8-0-0 record from 38 appearances, 2.24 goals against average, 0.920 save percentage, and 4 shutouts. For added comparison’s sake Mazanec’s 2015-16 season: 19-15-5-2 record from 39 appearances, 2.45 goals against average, 0.912 save percentage, and 4 shutouts. Numbers alone Saros, who was 20-year old the majority of this season, is there with the Admirals goaltending tandem of the previous two-seasons with room to be even better. That’s flat out scary.

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

(Photo Credit: Scott Paulus)

At the moment Saros is in Russia as part of Team Finland competing in the 2016 IIHF World Championships. He has played in a pair of games and, wouldn’t you believe it, has logged back-to-back shutouts while stopping all 27 shots he has faced against Hungary and Slovakia. Finland’s next opponent will be a stiffer test in the form of Canada who they will be facing today. It’s not a lock that Saros gets back in net for the final preliminary round and subsequent run to the 2016 IIHF World Championships Final but even if those two games were it you’re getting that same ol’ Saros. He competes his butt off in net and doesn’t let his height or size factor into his game. The reason for that is his between the ears sharpness. He reads the game so well and that IQ is what has allowed for such a seamless transition to the North American game.

When he arrives as a sophomore for the 2016-17 season he’ll still be only 21-years old. The Nashville Predators have their future starter. His path to get to and stay in Nashville is probably going to be similar to that of the Finn he projects to replace, Pekka Rinne. For those needing to be reminded Rinne played 145 games with the Admirals at the AHL level before firmly cementing himself as the go-to option in net for the Predators in the NHL. That came over the course of three-seasons. Should Saros take that same path, fulfilling his entry level contract in the process, Rinne would be 35-years old at the end of the 2017-18 season. Would that be around the time when the torch gets passed from one Finn to the next? Time will tell but time is what the Predators, Admirals, and Saros have. He’s young and he can only get more comfortable over time.

Be sure to keep updated with Admirals Roundtable through social media platform of your choice: follow along Twitter, like us on Facebook, get photo updates on Instagram, and listen along on SoundCloud.

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Predators Sign Justin Kirkland to Entry Level Contract

KELOWNA, CANADA - OCTOBER 23: Justin Kirkland #23 of Kelowna Rockets celebrates a goal against the Prince George Cougars on October 23, 2015 at Prospera Place in Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada.  (Photo by Marissa Baecker/Shoot the Breeze)

KELOWNA, CANADA – OCTOBER 23: Justin Kirkland #23 of Kelowna Rockets celebrates a goal against the Prince George Cougars on October 23, 2015 at Prospera Place in Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada. (Photo Credit: Marissa Baecker // Shoot the Breeze)

The Nashville Predators have announced the signing of Justin Kirkland to a three-year entry level contract. The 19-year old forward becomes the final member of the Predators 2014 NHL Draft Class to punch his ticket for North American pro hockey with the rest of that draft having been with the Milwaukee Admirals or with the Predators by the end of the season: Kevin Fiala, Vladislav Kamenev, Jack Dougherty, Viktor Arvidsson, Joonas Lyytinen, and Aaron Irving. To put it simply, what a shockingly good draft class to be able to say something like that inside of two-years.

Press Release via Nashville Predators:

Nashville, Tenn. (May 16, 2016) – Nashville Predators President of Hockey Operations/General Manager David Poile announced Monday that the club has signed 2014 third round selection Justin Kirkland to a three-year, entry-level contract.

Kirkland, 19 (8/2/96), amassed 67 points (31g-36a) in 69 games with the Western Hockey League’s Kelowna Rockets in 2015-16, his third season with the club. In 2014-15, the 6-foot-3, 183-pound left wing helped the Rockets claim the WHL regular-season and playoff titles and advance to the Memorial Cup Final, tying for sixth among all skaters in points (2g-3a-5pts, 5gp) at the tournament. The Camrose, Alta., native ranked eighth among Western Hockey League rookies in points (17g-31a-48pts) in 2013-14, and for his Kelowna career, has 169 points (71g-98a) in 199 games.

Nashville’s fourth choice, 62nd overall (third round), in the 2014 Entry Draft, Kirkland is on Twitter @Kirkland96.

Considering the Jimmy Vesey route seemingly died out this might not have just been your next best option but your better option if you are Nashville. Kirkland just finished playing his third and most successful full-season with the Kelowna Rockets of the WHL in junior hockey where he scored 67 points (31 goals, 36 assists) in 69 games as well as contributing 15 11 4 in 18 WHL Playoff games. In total, Kirkland’s Kelowna career spanned 199 games where he amassed 169 points (71 goals, 98 assists) with 47 WHL Playoff games where he scored 31 points (19 goals, 12 assists).

Kirkland has been a frequent guest with our friends over on Penalty Box Radio. In the most recent story featured on him over there I can’t help but highlight a quote from Kirkland that should set him apart from the likes of Vesey:

“Next year, I want to be able to make that jump to the American [Hockey] League,” Kirkland said. “Everyone wants to prove that they’re ready to play with the pros, so that’s my goal. We just finished up, so whatever was going on in the background, my agent and parents are handling that right now. Hopefully, they can get something done and I can land in Nashville, because who doesn’t want to be a part of that organization? It’s just kind of waiting around right now, but like I said, there are people behind the scenes that are handling that.”

How about having a player call a shot for the AHL over the NHL? Sounds like a perfect player for the Predators organization given the way they love to develop players at their own pace starting in Milwaukee before eventually seeing them gravitate to Nashville.

With Kirkland now bound to become a member of the Admirals for the 2016-17 season they are instantly due to receive yet another big bodied and skilled scoring winger that could instantly make a positive impact. Citing a desire to start in the AHL shows he has a good head on his shoulders. I suspect really great times are going to begin once he suits up for his professional playing debut in the fall.

Be sure to keep updated with Admirals Roundtable through social media platform of your choice: follow along Twitter, like us on Facebook, get photo updates on Instagram, and listen along on SoundCloud.

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The Best of Chatterbox, Season 3

(Photo Credit: Justin Bradford)

Chatterbox. This is usually what it looks like. Thanks for the chatting, Corey Potter. 10 Points to Gryffindor! (Photo Credit: Justin Bradford)

Did I say that “Best Of” Week was over? If so, swerve, there is more! The 2015-16 recap material still has a ways to go yet. This week will see the addition of End Season Awards ahead of the final Report Card. Today, I can think of no better item to get up prior to all of those than what can be used as the soundtrack when reading those last pieces of recap.

The 2015-16 season was the third season for our interview column Chatterbox and the debut season for the feature series Fifteen. This past playing season was jam packed full of soundbites from different individuals: 40 players, 3 members of front office staff, 3 coaches, 1 radio broadcaster, and 1 head athletic trainer. In total, there were 250 interviews conducted this season. That is a ton of chatting.

Another big game-changer in the Chatterbox department was the switch from the WordPress Media Player to SoundCloud. This provided hopefully far less technical issues than in the past. That was the main reason I made the jump because so often cutting up individual sound clips caused an overload to the website having so many different media players open in one go. Rather than do that, where the website runs slow or certain sounds clips wouldn’t play due to cache issues, Admirals Roundtable jumped to SoundCloud and never looked back.

I must say that unlike the previous two editions of the Best of Chatterbox this season isn’t very cut and dry. The individual sound clips of the past were abandoned for uploading entire interview segments to SoundCloud. This means, unlike Season 1 or Season 2, you won’t entirely be getting those segmented soundbites. Instead you’ll be getting a massive playlist with all the best of the best in interviews from the season. The good news? You can toggle through all the tracks easy as you like. The bad news? You aren’t getting straight to some of the key quotes, jokes, or stories like in the past. They are in there -but- you’ll have to listen to the full interview just as you did this past season. Sorry about that but it’s the most convenient way to go about this year’s Best of Chatterbox.

For me, personally, your quote of the season came in the last regular season game at the Bradley Center when Juuse Saros called it like he saw it. There weren’t as many interview bombs this season with the likes of Magnus Hellberg out of the organization and Anthony Bitetto up with the Nashville Predators so it had to be that line as the standout soundbite for me. Saros is such a well mannered, nice, honest, and polite guy. For him to have said that after a loss to keep it light made me die of laughter after that interview wrapped up.

Who were your favorite players to hear from this past season? What were your favorite interviews?

Be sure to keep updated with Admirals Roundtable through social media platform of your choice: follow along Twitter, like us on Facebook, get photo updates on Instagram, and listen along on SoundCloud.

Posted in Chatterbox, Feature | Leave a comment